This Road Looks Like It Suddenly Ends, But It’s Really A Tunnel Connecting Denmark And Sweden

The manmade island that links the bridge to the tunnel is called Peberholm. It was made from material taken up from the seabed beneath.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

On the island, plants and animals are allowed to live freely. This has made it a hotspot for biologists, who have identified over 500 different types of plants that now call the island their home. It’s also the habitat of a rare toad.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

Here, you can see the toll stations and the railway, which also operates on the structure.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

The pylons were the only pieces of the bridge to be constructed where it stands. The rest was built on land and placed by floating cranes.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

The bridge, which spans across the Flinte Channel, holds cars on the upper level and the railway beneath. The two pilons, which are around 670 feet tall, support the bridge.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

Since its opening, on July 1, 2000, this award-winning structure has provided 3.7 million residents with the route that allows them to work on either side.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet

The journey between Copenhagen and Malmo takes just over 30 minutes, and over 65 percent of the people who use this route travel by train.

Øresundsbro Konsortiet
Øresundsbro Konsortiet
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